TBR Pile Edition 3

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Let’s be real ~ these TBR piles are WAY too big to read in a weekend! I’m very proud of myself that I have completed all but two of the titles on last week’s stack, though, PLUS another title that I just couldn’t help myself from picking up Wednesday night when it showed up from Book of the Month. All of those reviews are on my Goodreads and Instagram accounts!

Here is what’s on my radar for the coming weekend and week ~ this might be my most ambitious and time sensitive stack yet! Two of these HAVE to be completed before the end of next week, so I guess I’ll be starting there……and three of them release on Tuesday and I like to have them read before release date…….eeeeeeeeek!

All descriptions from Goodreads

The Reader (Sea of Ink and Gold #1) by Traci Chee – YOUNG ADULT
(Putnam ~ September 13, 2016)

This is my final title to read for the Librarian Battle of the Books I will be competing in next Friday night!

thereaderOnce there was, and one day there will be. This is the beginning of every story.

Sefia lives her life on the run. After her father is viciously murdered, she flees to the forest with her aunt Nin, the only person left she can trust. They survive in the wilderness together, hunting and stealing what they need, forever looking over their shoulders for new threats. But when Nin is kidnapped, Sefia is suddenly on her own, with no way to know who’s taken Nin or where she is. Her only clue is a strange rectangular object that once belonged to her father left behind, something she comes to realize is a book.

Though reading is unheard of in Sefia’s world, she slowly learns, unearthing the book’s closely guarded secrets, which may be the key to Nin’s disappearance and discovering what really happened the day her father was killed. With no time to lose, and the unexpected help of swashbuckling pirates and an enigmatic stranger, Sefia sets out on a dangerous journey to rescue her aunt, using the book as her guide. In the end, she discovers what the book had been trying to tell her all along: Nothing is as it seems, and the end of her story is only the beginning.

The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware
(Gallery Books ~ July 19, 2016)

This is one that has been on my TBR for a LONG time, and is now the pick for my IRL book club meeting on Thursday!

womanincabin10In this tightly wound story, Lo Blacklock, a journalist who writes for a travel magazine, has just been given the assignment of a lifetime: a week on a luxury cruise with only a handful of cabins. At first, Lo’s stay is nothing but pleasant: the cabins are plush, the dinner parties are sparkling, and the guests are elegant. But as the week wears on, frigid winds whip the deck, gray skies fall, and Lo witnesses what she can only describe as a nightmare: a woman being thrown overboard. The problem? All passengers remain accounted for—and so, the ship sails on as if nothing has happened, despite Lo’s desperate attempts to convey that something (or someone) has gone terribly, terribly wrong…

With surprising twists and a setting that proves as uncomfortably claustrophobic as it is eerily beautiful, Ruth Ware offers up another intense read.

Strangers in Budapest by Jessica Keener
(Algonquin ~ November 14, 2017)

Thanks so much to Algonquin for this review copy – it looks fascinating!

strangersinbudapestBudapest: gorgeous city of secrets, with ties to a shadowy, bloody past.  It is to this enigmatic European capital that a young American couple, Annie and Will, move from Boston with their infant son shortly after the fall of the Communist regime. For Annie, it is an effort to escape the ghosts that haunt her past, and Will wants simply to seize the chance to build a new future for his family.

Eight months after their move, their efforts to assimilate are thrown into turmoil when they receive a message from friends in the US asking that they check up on an elderly man, a fiercely independent Jewish American WWII veteran who helped free Hungarian Jews from a Nazi prison camp. They soon learn that the man, Edward Weiss, has come to Hungary to exact revenge on someone he is convinced seduced, married, and then murdered his daughter.

Annie, unable to resist anyone’s call for help, recklessly joins in the old man’s plan to track down his former son-in-law and confront him, while Will, pragmatic and cautious by nature, insists they have nothing to do with Weiss and his vendetta. What Annie does not anticipate is that in helping Edward she will become enmeshed in a dark and deadly conflict that will end in tragedy and a stunning loss of innocence.

No Saints in Kansas by Amy Brashear – YOUNG ADULT
(Soho Teen ~ November 14, 2017)

Thanks to Soho Teen for this review copy – this YA title looks really compelling and I have read some great reviews of it!

nosaintsinkansasA gripping reimagining of Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood and the brutal murders that inspired it

November is usually quiet in Holcomb, Kansas, but in 1959, the town is shattered by the quadruple murder of the Clutter family. Suspicion falls on Nancy Clutter’s boyfriend, Bobby Rupp, the last one to see them alive.

New Yorker Carly Fleming, new to the small Midwestern town, is an outsider. She tutored Nancy, and (in private, at least) they were close. Carly and Bobby were the only ones who saw that Nancy was always performing, and that she was cracking under the pressure of being Holcomb’s golden girl. The secret connected Carly and Bobby. Now that Bobby is an outsider, too, they’re bound closer than ever.

Determined to clear Bobby’s name, Carly dives into the murder investigation and ends up in trouble with the local authorities. But that’s nothing compared to the wrath she faces from Holcomb once the real perpetrators are caught. When her father is appointed to defend the killers of the Clutter family, the entire town labels the Flemings as traitors. Now Carly must fight for what she knows is right.

Mean by Myriam Gurba
(Coffee House Press ~ November 14, 2017)

Thanks to Coffee House Press for this review copy – I’m so excited for this one after reading the stellar reviews in various newsletters I receive, as well as on Goodreads! It looks so powerful.

meanMyriam Gurba’s debut is the bold and hilarious tale of her coming of age as a queer, mixed-race Chicana. Blending radical formal fluidity and caustic humor, Mean turns what might be tragic into piercing, revealing comedy. This is a confident, funny, brassy book that takes the cost of sexual assault, racism, misogyny, and homophobia deadly seriously.
We act mean to defend ourselves from boredom and from those who would cut off our breasts. We act mean to defend our clubs and institutions. We act mean because we like to laugh. Being mean to boys is fun and a second-wave feminist duty. Being mean to men who deserve it is a holy mission. Sisterhood is powerful, but being mean is more exhilarating.

Being mean isn’t for everybody.

Being mean is best practiced by those who understand it as an art form.

These virtuosos live closer to the divine than the rest of humanity. They’re queers.

Army Wife: A Story of Love and Family in the Heart of the Army by Vicki Cody
(She Writes Press ~ August 16, 2016)

Thanks so much to BookSparks for this review copy! A perfect read for Veteran’s Day weekend as we honor all of those who have served in our armed forces. 

armywifeFrom the last days of the Vietnam War to the present-day war on terrorism, this story is a moving and poignant tribute to love, marriage, family, and the men and women who serve this nation. In describing her thirty-three-year journey as an Army wife, Cody gives an in-depth look at what it takes to keep a marriage strong, raise a family–oftentimes as a single parent–create a home, and face separations and loneliness amid the uncertainty and stresses that are so much a part of Army life. Over the years, Cody learns to embrace the uniqueness of her circumstances, and she finds joy, self-fulfillment, and pride in her role. But when both her sons follow in their dad’s footsteps, becoming Army Aviators and flying Apache helicopters in combat zones in Afghanistan and Iraq, Cody faces her greatest challenges as a mother and again, must balance the needs of her family with her husband’s position. Full of humor and honesty, Army Wife brings the reader into Cody’s private life in a very personal way, and in doing so opens the lens for a broader view of world events.

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “TBR Pile Edition 3

  1. Pingback: The Library at the Edge of the World by Felicity Hayes-McCoy | The Loud Library Lady

  2. Pingback: Thanksgiving Week TBR Edition 4 | The Loud Library Lady

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